華人超模新勢力

by Be-Blogger CHINA / 中國 on: 三月 2nd, 2012

近年來,華人頻頻躍上國際舞台,不論是運動、時尚到影劇等各領域,都能看到不少華人爭光,一改過去只被歐美國家壟斷的局面。

就時尚而言,像是設計師王大仁(Alexander Wang)、吳季剛(Jason Wu)到陳劭彥(Shao Yen Chen);珠寶配件設計師陳世英(Wallace Chan)、趙心綺(Cindy Chao)到胡茵菲(Anna Hu)等,再再顯示華人逐漸站穩國際時尚一席之地。隨著這些華人設計師的崛起,另一股讓人無法抗拒的超模新勢力也正在顛覆歐美時尚界!

Jason Wu / Alexander Wang / Shao Yen Chen

Anna Hu / Cindy Chao / Wallace Chan

中國超模近年來不斷站上國際伸展台,早期的杜鵑、裴蓓到現今的劉雯、孫菲菲、奚夢瑤、秦舒培及雎曉雯,這些女模從配角漸漸成為主角,不論是開秀、謝幕到全球性形象照,已經徹底佔領國際伸展台。劉雯更被知名模特兒網站Models.com評比為全球第六名的名模,其他模特兒也多次榮獲設計師及服裝編輯青睞,躍居重要角色。

不讓女模專美於前,男模同樣也相當精采,像是黄皆晨(Philip Huang)、傅正剛(Jerry Fu)、Models.com評比為全球第45名,同時也是中國男模排行第一的趙磊,以及最近被GQ評為2012 FW紐約時裝週最吸睛的新銳男模郝允祥(Hao Yunxiang),也都陸續出現在各大秀場上,可見這股華人超模熱潮,持續在歐美時尚界中燃燒!

Vincent Hsu, Ce n’est pas à la mode

 

 
 

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 紐約時裝週薪資大調查

by Be-Blogger CHINA / 中國 on: 二月 21st, 2012

紐約時裝週剛剛落幕,除了看到最新秋冬流行趨勢外,也看到不少時尚人士聚焦,可說是年度時尚盛事。時尚對大部分人來說是一個很虛幻、籠統的名詞,但它卻是個分層精細的產業。

以時裝週來說,各品牌在時裝秀上呈現出最新時尚趨勢,模特兒們光鮮亮麗的外表下,蘊藏著品牌設計師的最新設計概念,並融合造型師、髮型師及彩妝師的心血。而在伸展台下則是有來自全球的時尚編輯、記者、採購及攝影師,這些看似個別獨立的行業,卻都是和時尚產業環環相扣在一起。也因此許多人說時尚產業帶來可觀商機,同時也創造了許多就業機會。

PayScale網站近期以紐約時裝週為例,評估出上述各項和時尚產業有相關性的職業薪資,看看這些行業在為期八天的時裝週當中,可以賺得多少薪資!

Salaries on the Scene at Fashion Week

從圖表中可以看到時裝週中各類型的工作薪資,從造型師、時尚編輯、公關至警衛等,數字看起來都比一般工作週薪高,但所需面臨的工作壓力也是不相上下。想加入競爭激烈的時尚產業,可要有隨時熬夜加班的心理準備,當然不可或缺的是對時尚的一股熱忱!

註:模特兒及彩妝師典型工作型態各為一週14小時及29小時,另外模特兒的行情也會隨著知名度有所增減,圖中以2011全球模特兒排行榜第一名 – Gisele Bündchen為例。

Vincent Hsu, Ce n’est pas à la mode

 
 

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 China International Fashion Week

by United Blogs of Benetton on: 四月 20th, 2010

Some Highlights from Major BrandsChina International Fashion Week is something of a misnomer, since the brands on show, the media, and the spectators are over 95 per cent Chinese.
Still, China alone is a market so huge and rapidly growing that making it there often means you don’t need to make it anywhere else.

The biggest brands at this Fashion Week are mostly not known to outside China, but on the Mainland they are very successful, commercially at least. They may not be the most innovative, no where are the most widely worn brands the avantgarde ones, but they are definitely growing fast and gaining more attention.

Many of the themes and designs seem derivative, but the production level of the shows and clothes did seem on a nearly international level of quality – perhaps for he first time in the history of China fashion weeks.

Opening the week, Notting Hill really is named after and inspired by the Hugh Grant movie, though it is hard to see how. They collaborated with an artist to create a 3D effect show that had local media going gaga. The clothes were undeniably wearable and displayed a formal sensibility often absent from the runways of Chinese designers. Most of the outfits could be comfortably worn for a night out in Paris or London, though, ironically, they may be too much for Beijing. After the show the star studded audience was most enamored with the carefully controlled shocks of pink, notable in a sea of gray and black. The highlight might have been the little girl in the same pink who came out toward the end, suggesting that the chiseled dandies on the runway might have a soft side, though her own stern face suggested she would be quick to stomp any weakness.

Probably Mainland China’s most famous designer, Frankie Xie brought us a very 80s, rather Madonna themed show. Much of it was a bit too risque for comfort, though I think it was aimed mainly at sexy risk takers in the 35 over category. The gowns were probably the highlight. In 2006, he was the first Mainland Chinese designer to show his collections at Paris fashion week.

Menswear specialist Cabeen has hundreds of boutiques throughout the second tier cities of China selling clothes of dubious quality and often obnoxious design. Cabeen is like a cheap version of D&G geared to meet the tastes of hoodlums in some Asian version of Blade Runner. Low end hair dressers love this stuff. This show, however, showed products with an entirely different level of quality and finish. One expects runways to outdo the racks, but the gap for Cabeen was truly canyon like. The designers here did well reinterpreting some of the best plays with proportion and fur trimmed coats from recent shows in Paris and Milan.

Septwolves is another big chain with more prosaic but less offensive wares than Cabeen. Again, the show brings us the more high end collection of items. The designer here, Daniel Faret, is a Frenchmen. The theme was Beyond the Lights: Urban Warriors and the clothes were aggressive if not risky and definitely marketable. These warriors were quite certain in their choices and not ones to mess around with unexpected fabrics or wild colors. That said, there was a very nice blue that made an appearance on the runway and the light grays for winter picked up on a theme that has met with widespread approval from stylish men in recent seasons. The puffer blazers, cardigans and tweed trousers were among the must haves from this collection.

The name of this brand sounds European and the clothes are demurely feminine in a way that would work on the continent. This rather attractive if not terribly memorable collection was actually spring/summer. The fact that they chose to show the spring and summer collection while all the other brands were showing fall winter might show that Maris Frolg is particularly concerned for the women that actually wear the brand rather than the fashion media.

One event not on the normal schedule of China Fashion Week certainly gave a better party. There was no caviar, but the bubbly was flowing freely at this fashion show in Beijing’s hippest bar, D Lounge. There are several tropes that designer Candy Lin loves and one of the most notable is hoods, particularly on sport coats in nice wools. Their eye catching contrast linings seem to be, beyond the obvious need for keeping the head warm, the raison d’etre for the hoods.

Stylites in Beijing

 
 

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 China Look

by United Blogs of Benetton on: 三月 25th, 2010

China Fashion Week commenced at key venue Beijing Hotel. Here are images of the venue and spectatorsChina Fashion Week1: The first show was Notting Hill, a brand that bases its name on the movie starring Hugh Grant and Julia Roberts.

China Fashion Week 2: Fashion Week in Beijing always has a huge number of staff.

China Fashion Week 3: There were almost more ushers than media.

China Fashion Week 4: Beijing Hotel has very ornate ceilings

China Fashion Week 5: It is hard to sneak into events, though many students try to do this anyway.

China Fashion Week 6: Fashion editors always have nice glasses

China Fashion Week 7: Cao Difei (middle) is a talkshow host for BTV (Beijing TV)

China Fashion Week 8: This shirt represents status, taste, and creativity.

China Fashion Week 9: It is always nice to see something other than black.

China Fashion Week 10: Some dandyish flourishes were in evidence at this menswear show.

China Fashion Week 11: Admiring the styles he will be wearing in a few years.

China Fashion Week 12: This fashion design student from Harbin’s Agricultural University snuck into the event as my photographer. He said he will always remember since it was his first fashion show

Stylites in Beijing

 
 

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